If you’re considering getting pet insurance for your pet, you’re more than likely in the middle of doing some intense online research. After you’ve narrowed down your insurance choices (if you need some help, take a look at our comprehensive pet insurance options article) and talked to your vet about the companies you’re interested in, you’ll still need to make a list of questions to ask potential pet insurance providers. 

The following piece contains a handful of questions you should consider asking pet insurance providers. Although most pet insurance providers look good on paper (in this case— online), you’ll get more detailed information about the coverage each business provides with a phone call.

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Have A Preliminary Pet Insurance Conversation With Your Vet

Your vet will know what you need and if a specific company is better able to provide coverage. 

Dr. Joanna Woodnutt, a veterinarian in the United Kingdom and head of the veterinary team at Breed Advisor, explains that in general, vets can help you come up with detailed questions that will help you narrow down your pet insurance options. 

“In my experience, senior citizens need insurance that covers boarding fees more than the average pet owner," Woodnutt stated. "While some insurance policies will cover boarding fees, others will not. Find a company that will insure your pet for staying in the hospital if you can't give the medication prescribed. Even better, find a company that will pay for emergency boarding for your pet should you end up in hospital and unable to care for them for a period.”

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1. Will my vet take your insurance?

Although my research indicates that any pet insurance provider will accept insurance claims for medical care provided at all licensed veterinary clinics in the United States, I would call to make sure.

2. Does payment on certain conditions run out?

"A good pet insurance is one that covers any illnesses for life, and has a large enough condition or annual limit," Dr. Woodnutt claimed. "Some pet insurances stop paying out for a condition after 12 months, or pay out only a small amount for each condition. As a starting point, I'd recommend pet owners find insurance for at least $5000 dollars for cats and small dogs, and $8000 for larger breed dogs.”

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3. Ask Questions Specific to Your Pet's Needs

Will this insurance cover my outdoor-only cat? Does this insurance policy cover dental cleanings as well as dental diseases and tooth extractions?

What we're getting at here is that it's best to ask detailed questions so there are no surprises when you submit a claim. It's better to weed out the insurance policies that can't provide the coverage you and your pet need now rather than later. 

Although we could go on because the list of questions you could potentially ask an insurance provider are truly endless, we’ll stop here. 

The point we’re driving home is it’s best to be prepared and have a list of comprehensive questions at the ready when you’re calling insurance providers for information. So, don’t be shy! In the end, your pet and your wallet will thank you for the research you did before signing up for a policy.

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